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Project Post #3

This week, I tried to stick print’s image on the wall and frame it with some black cardboard to simulate the appearance of a window. It was an ideal form, and I wanted to create a sense of “looking through a window to the building on the other side”.


For this work, there are three levels of concepts and ideas I want to express.
The first: dense modern buildings. I mentioned my love for high-density buildings in Hong Kong in Hefty Post. Such high-density buildings are one of the best representatives of industrialization and modernization in my mind. The significance of The Times behind this “rule-abiding” template industrial architecture is extraordinary. Similarly, each window has a different landscape behind it, and when you look at them together, it’s like a million movies are playing in real time.
Second: About the relationship between audience/visitor, landscape and art work. I used to think that the relationship was one way, that we were always in an active position. We look unilaterally, get information, and absorb energy. In fact, the relationship is mutual. When we stand in front of this window and look at the characters inside, maybe there are people inside looking at you.
Third: privacy. This is my reflection on the environment of this era. Modern architecture increasingly relies on glass, which represents the absence of privacy. Have you ever had to pull down the curtains to cover a window because you had to change clothes? I believe that in the future, personal privacy is still a topic that needs to be questioned constantly.
But the problem I have now is that I think it’s too big at the moment. I may need to make some adjustments to make the size of the whole project conform to our exhibition room.

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Landscape and Human

For me, the first blog of this semester was meaningful. So I’d like to share some of the things that are important to me.

When we talk about the landscape, it’s obvious that I’m thinking not just of the landscape itself, but of the relationship between the landscape, nature and human beings. We have learned a lot about the inextricable connection between nature and human beings in Practice of the Wild.

Mentioning this, I have to share a documentary that has even influenced my life — Human. I saw it the day before I was an adult. It was produced by a French director. The director traveled to more than 60 countries and interviewed more than 2,000 people in three years. From president to tramp, from ex-soldier to prisoner, from aristocrat to prostitute… He asked them all kinds of questions about wealth and poverty, peace and war, sex and love. And in the interview, interspersed with all kinds of spectacular, exotic scenery. This includes not only the most native natural landscapes, but also man-made landscapes, as well as people. (People are landscape itself)

His composition contrast is very obvious. For the landscape, he uses all kinds of overlook composition to highlight the expansion of the landscape, while for the interview interlude, it is the simplest — the interviewees sit in front of a black curtain, staring at the camera and talking. I feel like I’m looking at you.

The closer I got to the end, the more I realized how small I was.

In a word, I hope I can have a deeper thinking about landscape and my relationship with landscape in this semester.

Landscape and Human

For me, the first blog of this semester was meaningful. So I’d like to share some of the things that are important to me.

When we talk about the landscape, it’s obvious that I’m thinking not just of the landscape itself, but of the relationship between the landscape, nature and human beings. We have learned a lot about the inextricable connection between nature and human beings in Practice of the Wild.

Mentioning this, I have to share a documentary that has even influenced my life — Human. I saw it the day before I was an adult. It was produced by a French director. The director traveled to more than 60 countries and interviewed more than 2,000 people in three years. From president to tramp, from ex-soldier to prisoner, from aristocrat to prostitute… He asked them all kinds of questions about wealth and poverty, peace and war, sex and love. And in the interview, interspersed with all kinds of spectacular, exotic scenery. This includes not only the most native natural landscapes, but also man-made landscapes, as well as people. (People are landscape itself) His composition contrast is very obvious.

For the landscape, he uses all kinds of overlook composition to highlight the expansion of the landscape, while for the interview interlude, it is the simplest — the interviewees sit in front of a black curtain, staring at the camera and talking. I feel like I’m looking at you. The closer I got to the end, the more I realized how small I was.

In a word, I hope I can have a deeper thinking about landscape and my relationship with landscape in this semester.